Black Cohosh: An Ancient Herb with Modern Uses

Cimicifuga Racemosa Black snake root, Bugbane Use the root

An American herb was first used by many Indian tribes such as the Dakotas, Penobscots, and the Winnebago. They used it internally and externally for such ailments as snake bites (they called it snakeroot), coughs, chest difficulties, diarrhea, and irregular menstruation. The flowers of Black Cohosh have a strong aroma that makes it an effective insect repellent and it is also the reason for its botanical name Cimicifuga which is Latin for insect repellent.

Lydia Pinkham

In this country, Black Cohosh was made famous by Lydia Pinkham who created a tincture for women in 1876 called: Lydia E. Pinkham’s Vegetable Compound. Black Cohosh was the main ingredient and it is said that 1/3 of the population of America was conceived by women using this tincture everyone called it “baby in a bottle”. Lydia became a very famous herbalist in America where she was named “the savior of her sex”. Her compound was sold in American drug stores until the 1930s when it was driven off the market by the medical establishment.

Dr. Andrew Weil was recently on the Larry King show discussing the use of hormone replacement therapy. He highly recommended the use of the herb Black Cohosh over drug therapies like Premarin, which are now being linked to cancer and heart problems.

How Does It Work? Get Yours Here!

Black Cohosh works directly on the lungs, heart, stomach, kidneys, and reproductive organs. Black Cohosh helps with hot flashes, it contracts the uterus and increases menstruation where it is sluggish. It is also an excellent nervine herb and is used in combination with nervous conditions for both men and women.

Medicinal Uses:

Asthma, Bee Stings, Blood Cleanser, High Blood Pressure, Bronchitis, Childbirth, Diarrhea, Dropsy, Dysmenorrhea, Epilepsy, Estrogen Deficiency, Fevers, Hormone Balancer, Hot Flashes, Hysteria, Insect Bites, Lungs, Malaria, Measles, Menopause, Menstrual Problems, Neuralgia, Poison Antidote, Poisonous Bites Rheumatism, Snake Bites, Sores, Spasms, Spinal Meningitis, Saint Vitus Dance, Tuberculosis, Whooping Cough.

Female Balance Formula:

Wild Yam, Black Cohosh root, Chaste Tree berry, Angelica root, Dong Quai root, Motherwort herb, Licorice root, Cramp Bark, Skullcap herb, Ginger root, Horsetail herb, Damiana leaf, Hops flower, Lobelia herb/seed

Black Cohosh and TheHerbProf.com: A Herbal Harmony!

Black Cohosh Chronicles: At TheHerbProf.com, we’re all about Black Cohosh! We delve into its health-boosting properties and its role in herbal medicine.

Herbal Highlights: Learn how Black Cohosh can enhance your herbal routine. It’s not just a plant; it’s a wellness wonder!

Culinary Creations: Black Cohosh in the kitchen? Absolutely! We share innovative recipes that bring out the best in Black Cohosh.

Health and Wellness: We’re all about health and wellness, and Black Cohosh is a key part of this mission. It’s packed with compounds that promote good health.

Community Connection: Join our community of Black Cohosh enthusiasts! Share your journey, learn from others, and make some new friends.

So, whether you’re a Black Cohosh buff or just starting your herbal journey, TheHerbProf.com is your trusty companion. Dive in, explore, and stay healthy!

References:

Little Herb Encyclopedia, by Jack Ritchason; N.D., Woodland Publishing Incorporated, 1995
The Ultimate Healing System, Course Manual, Copyright 1985, Don Lepore
Planetary Herbology, Michael Tierra, C.A., N.D., Lotus Press, 1988
Handbook of Medicinal Herbs, by James A. Duke, Pub. CRP Second Edition 2007
The Complete Medicinal Herbal, by Penelope Ody, Published by Dorling Kindersley

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