Pine Tree Bark or Needles
  Pinus Maritima

Pine Needles, container rich assorted bioflavonoid, Proanthocyanidins (Pycnogenol), enhances Vitamin C.

History: Jacques Cartier, in his book, “Voyages to Canada” (1534-5), credited a herbal tea made form the needles and bark of the Anneda Tree, a Canadian pine tree, with saving the lives of his crew when they were stranded by ice on the St. Lawrence River.   Of his 110-man crew, 25 were dead, 50 were seriously ill and the remainder of the crew were too weak to even bury the dead.   All looked lost until they were rescued by friendly Quebec Indians who were experts on the medicinal properties of the local plants.   The Indians told the Frenchmen how to brew a tea from the bark and needles of pine trees growing in the area.   They tried the tea on two of the sickest crewmembers; they improved so quickly that Cartier gave the tea to all the surviving members of his crew.   All the crewmembers recovered from the dreaded scurvy due to this tea. 

Four hundred years later, professor Jacques Masquelier, doing research on pine bark, grape skins and several nutshells looked into the records of Cartier’s experience.    The professor found that the Maritime Pine contained the richest available supply of assorted bioflavonoids.   This blend was called Proanthocyanidins, which he later patented under the name Pycnogenol.   The pine needles contained Vitamin C and the pine bark flavonoids, which enhances the vital functions of the Vitamin C.    This is the very combination of the tea the Indians taught Cartier and his men that supplies the nutrients lacking in a diet low in fresh fruits and vegetables, which can result in scurvy.

Free radicals are toxic by-products of the body’s natural metabolic processes that cause oxidative damage to cells and tissues.    In addition, environmental factors such as alcohol, cigarette smoke, air and water pollutants, pesticides, fried foods, refined foods and their preservatives, household cleaners, radiation, anesthetics, physical and emotional stress, coffee, microwave ovens, electromagnetic fields and power lines etc., add to this burden.

The bioflavonoids in pycnogenol have the ability to provide the substance of life that will help rebuild the system by supplying the anti-oxidants that reduce free radical scavengers that cause the oxidative damage to cells mentioned above.  Pycnogenol’s ability to stop this free radical damage not only helps the internal body maintain its youth but it is considered an oral cosmetic for what it can do to maintain youthful skin.

Pycnogenol inhibits the natural enzymes of the body.    All cells in the human body are glued together with collagen.  By restoring collagen, Pycnogenol helps return flexibility to skin, joints, arteries, capillaries and other tissues. 

Pycnogenol strengthens the entire arterial system and improves circulation.    It reduces capillary fragility and develops skin smoothness and elasticity. 

Pycnogenol has been used successfully for diabetic retinopathy, varicose veins, and hemorrhoids.    It is one of the few dietary anti-oxidants that readily crosses the blood-brain barrier to directly protect brain cells and aid memory.

Uses:
Allergies, Arthritis, Atherosclerolis, Brain Dysfunction, Cancer, Circulatory problems, Edema, Diabetic Retinopathy, Hay fever, Heart Disease, Memory, Osteroarthritis, Skin Eruptions, Sports Injuries, Stress, Varicose Veins, Viruses

Sources:
Little Herb Encyclopedia, by Jack Ritchason; N.D., Woodland Publishing Incorporated, 1995
Nutritional Herbology, by Mark Pedersen, Wendell W. Whitman Company, 1998
The Ultimate Healing System, Course Manual, Copyright 1985, Don Lepore
Planetary Herbology, Michael Tierra, C.A., N.D., Lotus Press, 1988

 

 

 

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Important Note:
The information presented herein by The Natural Path Botanicals is intended for educational purposes only. These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, cure, treat or prevent disease. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

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